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Pathways: Information Literacy Integration into the Hunter College Common Core

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Pathways Flexible Core

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World Culture and Global Issues
Pathways Flexible Core


All Flexible Core courses must meet the following three learning
outcomes. A student will:

  • Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view
  • Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically
  • Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

· Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline
or interdisciplinary field exploring world cultures or global issues,
including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural
studies, economics, ethnic studies, foreign languages (building upon
previous language acquisition), geography, history, political science,
sociology, and world literature.
· Analyze culture, globalization, or global cultural diversity, and describe an
event or process from more than one point of view.
· Analyze the historical development of one or more non-U.S. societies.
· Analyze the significance of one or more major movements that have
shaped the world’s societies.
· Analyze and discuss the role that race, ethnicity, class, gender, language,
sexual orientation, belief, or other forms of social differentiation play in
world cultures or societies.
· Speak, read, and write a language other than English, and use that
language to respond to cultures other than one’s own.

GER Core (Stages 2B or 2C)

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U.S. Experience in its Diversity
Pathways Flexible Core


All Flexible Core courses must meet the following three learning
outcomes. A student will:

  • Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view
  • Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically
  • Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

· Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline
or interdisciplinary field exploring the U.S. experience in its diversity,
including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural
studies, economics, history, political science, psychology, public affairs,
sociology, and U.S. literature.
· Analyze and explain one or more major themes of U.S. history from more
than one informed perspective.
· Evaluate how indigenous populations, slavery, or immigration have
shaped the development of the United States.
· Explain and evaluate the role of the United States in international
relations.
· Identify and differentiate among the legislative, judicial, and executive
branches of government and analyze their influence on the development of
U.S. democracy.
· Analyze and discuss common institutions or patterns of life in
contemporary U.S. society and how they influence, or are influenced by,
race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, belief, or other forms of
social differentiation.

Stage 1C – HIST 151, HIST 152, POLSC 110. All sections of all 3 courses must be W intensive

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Creative Expression
Pathways Flexible Core

All Flexible Core courses must meet the following three learning
outcomes. A student will:

  • Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view
  • Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically
  • Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

· Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline
or interdisciplinary field exploring creative expression, including, but not
limited to, arts, communications, creative writing, media arts, music, and
theater.
· Analyze how arts from diverse cultures of the past serve as a foundation
for those of the present, and describe the significance of works of art in the
societies that created them.
· Articulate how meaning is created in the arts or communications and how
experience is interpreted and conveyed.
· Demonstrate knowledge of the skills involved in the creative process.
· Use appropriate technologies to conduct research and to communicate.

Stage 2D

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Individual and Society
Pathways Flexible Core

All Flexible Core courses must meet the following three learning
outcomes. A student will:

  • Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view
  • Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically
  • Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

· Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline
or interdisciplinary field exploring the relationship between the individual
and society, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications,
cultural studies, history, journalism, philosophy, political science,
psychology, public affairs, religion, and sociology.
· Examine how an individual’s place in society affects experiences, values,
or choices.
· Articulate and assess ethical views and their underlying premises.
· Articulate ethical uses of data and other information resources to respond
to problems and questions.
· Identify and engage with local, national, or global trends or ideologies,
and analyze their impact on individual or collective decision-making.

Stage 2B will reside in Area 1-Social Science  and courses from Stage 2C-Humanities, Cultures and Ideas will reside in Area 2.

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Scientific World
Pathways Flexible Core

All Flexible Core courses must meet the following three learning
outcomes. A student will:

  • Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view
  • Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically
  • Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

· Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline
or interdisciplinary field exploring the scientific world, including, but not
limited to: computer science, history of science, life and physical sciences,
linguistics, logic, mathematics, psychology, statistics, and technologyrelated
studies.
· Demonstrate how tools of science, mathematics, technology, or formal
analysis can be used to analyze problems and develop solutions.
· Articulate and evaluate the empirical evidence supporting a scientific or
formal theory.
· Articulate and evaluate the impact of technologies and scientific
discoveries on the contemporary world, such as issues of personal privacy,
security, or ethical responsibilities.
· Understand the scientific principles underlying matters of policy or public
concern in which science plays a role.

non-laboratory courses from Stage 2E will reside in this category. It is also expected that some courses from Stage 2B or 2C or Focused Exposure will meet the learning objectives and be appropriate for this category.

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Information Literacy Integration

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World Culture and Global Issues
Information Literacy Integration


World Cultures and Global Issues courses are supported by the Libraries' subject specialists. They work collaboratively with course instructors to:

1. teach lab-based research sessions focused on: finding and evaluating information sources specific to each discipline or interdisciplinary field; knowing and using the vocabulary, concepts and theoretical framework of a discipline to identify and evaluate relevant contextual sources (historical, cultural, economic...) and new research findings; selecting specialized databases, catalogs and credible Web-based sites that provide counter-arguments, different points of view or schools of thought.

These sesslons are provided by request of faculty and are also integrally-offered to students enrolled in block programs which include 100 level core courses in this area.  Block sessions are also integrated into the Eng 120 block curricula and are aligned with the subjects in each block.

2. offer the LIBR 100 credit-course as a co-requisite for students enrolled in specific blocks which include 100 level core courses

3. create Web-based resource guides (LibGuides) for subject areas in this core, including: Anthropology, African History, Arabic Language & Literature, Chinese Language, Literature & Cullture, ClassicsHebrew Language & Literature, Romance Languages, Women's Studies

4. provide students individual research consultations

5. schedule bibliographic management workshops

6. promote Academic Integrity:  tutorials on citation, plagiarism and ethical uses of information sources are accessible to faculty and students on the Libraries' Information Literacy Commons site; the Libraries are working with Student Services to develop a Hunter College Academic Integrity tutorial and assessment that may include a plagiarism poll.

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U.S. Experience in its Diversity
Information Literacy Integration


U.S. Experience in its Diversity courses are supported by the Libraries' subject specialists. They work collaboratively with course instructors to:

1. teach lab-based research sessions focused on: finding and evaluating information sources specific to each discipline or interdisciplinary field; knowing and using the vocabulary, concepts and theoretical framework of a discipline to identify and evaluate relevant contextual sources (historical, cultural, economic...) and new research findings; selecting specialized databases, catalogs and credible Web-based sites that provide counter-arguments, different points of view or schools of thought.

These sesslons are provided by request of faculty and are also integrally-offered to students enrolled in block programs which include 100 level core courses in this area.  Block sessions are also integrated into the Eng 120 block curricula and are aligned with the subjects in each block.

2. offer the LIBR 100 credit-course as a co-requisite for students enrolled in specific blocks which include 100 level core courses.

3. create Web-based resource guides (LibGuides) for subject areas in this core, including: History, Political Science, Hist 151, Polsc 110Hist 152.

4. provide students individual research consultations.

5. schedule bibliographic management workshops.

6. promote Academic Integrity:  tutorials on citation, plagiarism and ethical uses of information sources are accessible to faculty and students on the Libraries' Information Literacy Commons site; the Libraries are working with Student Services to develop a Hunter College Academic Integrity tutorial and assessment that may include a plagiarism poll.


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Creative Expression
Information Literacy Integration

Library faculty provide information literacy curricula for the courses (all 100 level) specified in this area by:

1. teaching lab-based research sessions focused on finding and evaluating various types of information sources (primary, secondary, scholarly, popular, media) and using them effectively and responsibly. 

These sesslons are provided by request of faculty, and are also integrally-offered to students enrolled in block programs which include 100 level core courses in this area.  Block sessions are also integrated into the Eng 120 block curricula, and are aligned with the subjects in the block (e.g. Changing Society, Diversity in America, etc.).

2. offering the LIBR 100 credit-course as a co-requisite for students enrolled in specific blocks which include 100 level core courses

3. creating Web-based resource guides (LibGuides) for subject areas in this core, including: Music, Art, and Theatre

4. providing students individual research consultations

5. scheduling bibliographic management workshops

6. providing Academic Integrity tutorials on citation, plagiarism and ethical uses of information sources are accessible to faculty and students on the Libraries' Information Literacy Commons site; the Libraries are working with Student Services to develop a Hunter College Academic Integrity tutorial and assessment that may include a plagiarism poll.

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Individual and Society
Information Literacy Integration

The library faculty provide information literacy curricula for the courses specified in this area by:

1. teaching lab-based research sessions focused on finding and evaluating various types of information sources (primary, secondary, scholarly, popular, media) and using them effectively and responsibly. Courses taught include Soc 101, Thea 211, Urbs 101, Geog 260, Psych 100, Media 180.

2. offering the LIBR 100 credit-course as a co-requisite for students enrolled in specific Blocks which include 100 level core courses

3. creating Web-based resource guides (LibGuides) for subject areas in this core, including: Psychology, Anthropology, Religion, Political Science; creating course-based research guides for Thea 211, Geog 260, Soc 101

4. providing students individual research consultations

5. scheduling bibliographic management workshops

6. providing Academic Integrity tutorials on citation, plagiarism and ethical uses of information sources are accessible to faculty and students on the Libraries' Information Literacy Commons site; the Libraries are working with Student Services to develop a Hunter College Academic Integrity tutorial and assessment that may include a plagiarism poll.

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Scientific World
Information Literacy Integration

The library faculty provide information literacy curricula for the courses (all 100 level) specified in this area by offering:

1. Instruction sessions by request of faculty; sessions also integrally-offered to students enrolled in Block programs which include 100 level core courses in this area.  These Block sessions are also integrated into the Eng 120 block curricula, and are aligned with the subjects in the block(e.g. Health and Community, Science and the Medical Professions, Mind, etc.).

2. the LIBR 100 credit-course as a co-requisite for students enrolled in specific blocks which include 100 level core courses

3. Web-based resource guides (LibGuides) for subject areas in this core, including: Biology, Chemistry, Geography and Environmental Sciences, Physics and Astronomy, and Psychology which can certainly be integrated into course curricula to direct students to relevant information resources.

4.  Individual research consultations

5,  Regularly scheduled bibliographic management workshops

6. Academic Integrity tutorials on citation, plagiarism and ethical uses of information sources which are accessible to faculty and students on the Libraries' Information Literacy Commons site; the Libraries are working with Student Services to develop a Hunter College Academic Integrity tutorial and assessment that may include a plagiarism poll.